Userform Textbox Autocomplete

I’m working on a project where the user types some stuff into a textbox. A good portion of the time, what the user will type will match one of the last few things he typed. I wanted the textbox to autocomplete if there was a match to a list. Pretty simple, I think. For purposes of this demonstration, I’m going to match to a list of random sentences in a listbox.

I had to use that old disable events in a userform trick otherwise setting the .Text property would call the change event again.

I only look at the first five characters. After that, you just have to type what you want. If there’s a match, I set the .Text property to the matching sentence and set the selection so that the user can continue typing. It all worked very nicely except for backspacing. In the above screenshot, I’ve typed He but the textbox contains the whole sentence. If I hit backspace in this situation, I delete the highlighted portion and I’m left with He. Backspace does nothing.

I was hoping to find a simple and elegant solution. Instead, I did this.

I’m using a module-level variable to determine if the backspace was pressed while in the textbox. If it was and there’s still at least one character, I simply shorten the sEntered variable by one character. That leaves the whole SelStart and SelLength mechanism working as expected.

In an userform list all available fonts

The motivation for this tip was to share how to

1) dynamically add controls to a userform
2) respond to events for these controls, and
3) specifically respond to events using a callback procedure that is located in another class module!

Since this may come across as a fairly technical topic, this tip utilizes the above capabilities to provide a functional solution:

1) list in an userform the names of all available fonts with each name shown using that font,
2) hover over the option button associated with a font to see a sample of every English keyboard character in that font,
3) click on the option button to select the font, and, finally,
4) use this capability to programmatically get the user’s selection, if any.

Below is an example of the font selector in action. Each OptionButton shows the name of one available font using the font itself. At the same time, the control tool tip shows the font name in English (see the Wide Latin tip). A sample of how every keyboard character will look in that font appears below the font selector frame.

The motivation for this example was a Daily Dose of Excel blog post by Michael (http://www.dailydoseofexcel.com/archives/2012/03/14/getting-a-font-list-to-a-combo-box-2/). He used a combo box to list the fonts available to Excel leveraging a technique shown in a tip by John Walkenbach (http://www.j-walk.com/ss/excel/tips/tip79.htm).

For a version in a page by itself (i.e., not in a scrollable iframe as below) visit http://www.tushar-mehta.com/publish_train/xl_vba_cases/1054%20show%20fonts%20in%20userform.shtml

Tushar Mehta