RefTreeAnalyser: Two updates

Hi There,

It’s been a while since I last posted here. Today I have released an update of my RefTreeAnalyser utility.

The tool now allows you to add a Table Of Contents to your workbook which contains lists of all sheets, all charts and all Pivottables:

In addition I have added a Feedback button to enable my users to send their complaints -I mean compliments- directly to me! So as of now, if you have ideas for improvements or suggestions for additions or a bug to report, use that feedback button!

Be safe!

Jan Karel Pieterse

Opening a File from a Userform Disables Ribbon

In Excel 2019 16.0.10361.20002 32-bit, when I open a file from a userform (which for me is always), the hotkeys on the Ribbon don’t work. Here’s how I reproduce:

In a new workbook, add a userform named UserForm1. Add a commandbutton to the userform. Paste this code in the userform’s code module.

Add a standard module to the workbook and past this code into it.

Close the VBE and return to Excel. Press Ctrl+F8 and run the macro and click the button. Now press the Alt key. I don’t get these guys:

If I Alt+Tab away and back, they show up again. If you launch the form from the VBE, you have to Alt+Tab to get to Excel so the test doesn’t work.

Also, I hadn’t tried this until just now, but I can’t even click on the Ribbon with mouse. Nothing happens. My next tack is to close and unload the userform before opening the file and see if that takes care of it. It’s odd though. It’s the only odd thing in 2019 and building up a pretty nice rant about it. Two posts in one year? Yep, it could happen.

Excel Virtually Global

https://excelvirtuallyglobal.com/

Tue 21 July to Thu 23 July 2020

Microsoft’s Most Valuable Professionals, or MVPs, are technology experts
who passionately share their knowledge with the community.  They are
always on the “bleeding edge” and have an unstoppable urge to get their
hands on new, exciting technologies. This virtual conference, now in its
fifth year, presents Excel, Data Platform and PowerPoint MVPs, together
with other acknowledged experts from Microsoft and / or around the globe
to present, answer questions and demonstrate the future of Excel and how
it will make your life easier, personally and professionally.
Topics include: Auditing Spreadsheets, Charts, Dashboards, Data
Analysis, Data Types, Dynamic Arrays, Excel Tricks & Tips, Financial
Modelling, Forecasting, Maps, Microsoft 365, New Functions and Features,
PivotTables, Power BI, Power Pivot, Power Query, Presenting Your Data,
Spilled Formulae, Testing, Timelines and developing solutions with DNA
.Net, VBA, Python, R, OfficeScript and Office-JS.  And note well – it’s
not all in English, with sessions in Mandarin, Portuguese, Spanish and
Telugu, as well.

Most sessions will be recorded so you may watch them later with
downloads aplenty – there are no medals for staying up to watch the
entire event live!

 From your own favourite chair, bring a laptop, an inquisitive mind and
your sense of humour.  Be prepared to learn heaps.  And remember, it’s
for charity – all profits will be donated to a global COVID-19 research
charity.

Price only US$23 Tickets at
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/excel-virtually-global-a-virtual-excel-summit-tickets-106319837496
(or just click ‘Register’ on the first site)

Excel VBA Masterclass

Hi there. Hope you and yours are well in these difficult times!

This is just a very short announcement that I’ll be doing an on-line version of my Excel VBA Masterclass.

The training is scheduled for May 18, 20, 26, 28, June 2, 4 and I’ll be using Microsoft Teams to deliver it to your homes!

Register now!

Regards,

Jan Karel Pieterse

International Keyboard Shortcut Day 2019

The first Wednesday of every November is International Keyboard Shortcut Day. This Wednesday, people from all over the world will become far less efficient for a short time in an effort to be far more efficient the rest of the year.

WASD V2 88-Key ISO Custom“WASD V2 88-Key ISO Custom” by Bitboxer is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

This year I’ll be starting all of my programs with the keyboard. First, I’m going to hide the Cortana search bar because that’s just a waste of real estate. Ironically, the best way to do this is with your mouse. Right-click on the taskbar, choose Cortana, and Hidden.

Now let’s pin some frequently used applications to the taskbar. Start the application however you normally would. Find the icon in your taskbar, right-click on it, and choose Pin to Taskbar.

I have eight applications pinned to my taskbar. I can open these using the Windows key and the number representing that applications position in the taskbar. For me Outlook is first, so I would use Windows+1 to open Outlook.

Every morning, I unlock my computer, hold down the Windows key, and press 2, 3, 5, and 7. This opens all the programs that I leave running all day. I never close Outlook because of all the client side rules I have, but I include Win+1 to that process after a reboot. I used to open #4 every day, but that’s fallen out of favor. But I don’t want to remove it and change the positions or all the other icons.

In addition to opening the program, Win+number switches to that application if it’s already running. If that application already has the focus, it gets moved to the back of the line and hidden. Just press the shortcut again to bring it back to the front. If you have multiple instances running, like multiple Word docs or Excel files, continue holding down the Windows key and pressing the number to cycle through all the documents. When the one you want is at the front, release the Win key.

One more thing about the taskbar: let’s say you have a bunch of File Explorer windows open, which you no doubt opened using Win+E. To close them all at once, press Win+Alt+number to get a context menu and choose Close All Windows. I don’t have File Explorer pinned to my taskbar, so its position in the list isn’t the same every time. But it’s usually ninth or tenth. In this example, it’s tenth so I use Win+Alt+0 to bring up the context menu.

You might have also noticed that you could have used the Win+Alt context menu to pin the application to the taskbar instead of right clicking. If you did, you get an IKSD bonus.

OK, last tip before you’re on your way to a great keyboarding day. If you want to open a program that’s not pinned to the task bar, press and release the windows key and start typing the application’s name. For instance, if I want to open Powerpoint, I press and release Win and type power.

Windows shows you everything that has power in the name or description. The “best match” is usually what I’m looking for, but you can see that you can also get to PowerShell or the power settings control panel using this method. If you have some recently used documents, those will also appear. When I type ues to open Ultra Edit Studio, it shows me a few documents I used recently.

I hope you use these techniques on Wednesday to open your applications using your keyboard and become a little more productive. Happy keyboarding.

Putting Statistics

Because of my recent terrible putting, I decided to keep track of every putt to see what I can see about it. Here’s how I compiled the stats.

I wrote down how many paces each putt was and assumed one step was 2.5 feet. The Made formula in the table is

For that date and hole, see if there’s a putt with a higher number. If not, I must have made that one. The Left formula is

Same as the last except that it sums the length of the putt that’s one higher. Over in the stats table, I use these formulas

Made:

If it’s greater than or equal to the first number and less than or equal to the second number and I made it, count it.

Made %:

Take the number made and divide it by the total putts in that distance range. The IFERROR is for divide by zero errors.

Avg Left:

This sums all the “Left” numbers for putts not made and divides by the number of putts not made.

Max Left:

This one’s an array formula, so enter with Ctrl+Shift+Enter, not just enter.

In retrospect, I should have noted putts that went past the hole as negative distances and putts that were short of the hole as positive distances. I could have got the same stats as above plus I would know if I had a tendency to be short or long. It feels like enough bookkeeping for the golf course already, but maybe I’ll implement that change in the future.

So, what did I learn? I learned that I like numbers and statistics, but I don’t think I learned anything useful for my golf game.

You can download PuttingDistance.zip

Combinations, Combinations. A challenge

In case you’re bored stiff during your holiday, here’s a nice Excel challenge for you all.

In my newsletter for May 2019 I showed you a trick to get all possible combinations of two lists. This time I have a related problem. Suppose I have 10 ballot tickets. My job is to draw 5 random tickets from that set of 10 repeatedly until I have drawn all possible combinations:

The challenge I would like to give you all:
Please use any technique in Excel to list all possible unique combinations of ticket numbers drawn this way. Note that the order in which the tickets are drawn makes no difference and that each number can only be drawn once per set of 5. This means that a draw of (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) is considered the same as (5, 4, 3, 2, 1) or (2, 1, 3, 4, 5).

What’s in it for you?

The 5 best submissions will receive:

Send your solutions to info@jkp-ads.com using this subject line: “JKPADS Combinations Challenge”

Submission ends on September 9, 2019