Books

This is a list of books that I recommend or that have been recommended to me by someone I trust. If you click on them and buy them, I get money.

Update: Frank suggested I provide a place where people can comment on books they’ve read, so I’ve enabled comments for this page. I’ll be monitoring those comments closely, so keep them on topic please. Good suggestion Frank. Thanks.

Excel 2007 Formulas

Power Programming VBA Devs Handbook
Excel 2007 Formulas
(Walkenbach)
Excel 2003 Power Programming in VBA
(Walkenbach)
VBA Developers Handbook
(Getz, Gilbert)
     
Professional Excel Development A Book on C Excel Add-in Development
Professional Excel Development
(Bullen, Bovey, Green)
A Book on C
(Kelley, Pohl)
Excel Add-in Development in C\C++
(Dalton)
     
C++ Primer Code Complete Excel Pivot Table Recipes
C++ Primer
(Lippman, Lajoie, Moo)
Code Complete
(McConnell)
Excel PivotTables Recipes
(Dalgleish)
     
Excel 2007 VBA Programmer's Reference Excel Charts Excel Bible
Excel 2007 VBA Programmer’s Reference
(Green, Bovey, Bullen, Alexander)
Excel Charts
(Walkenbach)
Excel 2003 Bible
(Walkenbach)
Excel VBA Programming for Dummies
Excel VBA Programming For Dummies
(Walkenbach)

6 Comments

  1. Peter Brown says:

    Recommended books

    Pivot Table Data Crunching, Excel 2010, Mr Excel series, Bill Jensen and Michael Alexander – first class reference; easy to understand and follow; one of the most useful books I have bought in some time; QUE

    Excel 2010 In depth, Bill Jensen, a more advanced reference book with a different approach to many; very stong on functions; QUE

    I also use Excel Pivot Tables and Charts, Peter Aitken, Excel Dashboards and Reports, Alexander and Walkenbach and Favourite Excel 2007 Tips and Tricks, Walkenbach but I have not updated them to the 2010 versions. The usual problem is, are they sufficiently different from the previous verson?

  2. Ben Freeman says:

    I’ve read Professional Excel Development cover to cover and have to say it is possible the best book on programming I have ever come across. What sets it apart is the fact it is both technically informative and yet easily readable, packed full of examples and explanations which explain why as well as how an approach works or is best practice. I thought I knew VBA, but it has taken me to a different level. Every VBA programmer should have a copy.

  3. Raj says:

    Guys,

    I am in search of a code that will ask for a username and password before opening the workbook. It should contain multiple usernames and passwords. For each username and password different sheets should be shown after the successful login. The other sheets in the workbook should remain hidden and protected.

    Hope you guys can help! Thanks for any help!

  4. Jeff Weir says:

    Raj – note that protection in Excel is very easy to crack. So if this is going to contain say salary information, then don’t do it. Locks only keep honest people out, as the saying goes.

    That said, you can find some code at this thread:
    http://www.excelguru.ca/forums/showthread.php?1626-Show-hidden-sheet-and-columns-based-on-user&highlight=password

    But again, note that whatever approach you use, someone who knows what they are doing will be able to break your security in 2 minutes flat.

  5. Dru says:

    Professional Excel Development – at least one of the reviewers said it is based on 2003 (pub. 2005). Is it relevant for 2010 or 2013 users? Or is there a better book? I also note a couple editions, the 2nd pub in 2009 and says it covers .NET. Is it as solid as the first edition which is mentioned in your list here?

  6. Dick Kusleika says:

    You should get the 2nd edition (and I should update my list). I don’t know what version of Excel it covers, but it doesn’t matter for two reasons: The principles of the book transcend versions; VBA and the VBE haven’t changed much, only the Excel object model. I believe they brought in Dennis Wallentin for the .NET chapters in the second edition, so you know they’ll be good.

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