Excel 2013 v Excel 2010 Speed Test

There are a lot of good comments on the Excel 2013 Is Unreasonably Slow post, but none of them worked for me. Even a generous offer from keepItCool, but I can’t send the problem child due to proprietary information. So I’m trying to demonstrate the problem in a simpler fashion.

I create a template and insert it into a new workbook five times. This is more or less what my other code is doing. Actually it’s quite a bit less and the templates in the other code are a lot fatter. But I think it demonstrates the point.

Split Excel 2013 (Home) Excel 2010 (Home) Excel 2013 (Office, Local) Excel 2013 (Office, Network)
Start 0.75 0.55 0.66 2.82
Create template 257.68 161.60 445.96 562.40
Insert template 1 449.85 246.10 739.31 927.03
Insert template 2 638.71 345.13 1,058.17 1,292.53
Insert template 3 832.92 429.95 1,367.04 1,716.61
Insert template 4 1,030.99 517.06 1,696.34 2,109.36
Insert template 5 1,247.35 611.32 2,023.30 2,467.81
End 1,247.63 611.70 2,024.43 2,523.20

Excel home is my machine. I have both versions installed. The office times are where my original code runs in production. The “Local” times are when the code is on the desktop and the “Network” time is when the code is on a server.

There’s a lot I’m not happy about here. If I could cut the 2013 times in half, I would be not-unhappy. Note also that I’m not protecting or unprotecting anything – a known change in 2013 that slows things down.

Give it a try, if you like, and let me know what your times are. The home hardware is Intel i7 860 @ 2.8Ghz with 8GB RAM / Windows 7 64 bit, Excel 32 bit.

You can download TemplateInsertTimeTest.xlsm

17 thoughts on “Excel 2013 v Excel 2010 Speed Test

  1. I’d like to try it, but where do I get

    ? Is it from some external reference, or is it from your own toolbox?

  2. Start 1
    Create template 579
    Insert template 1 865
    Insert template 2 1135
    Insert template 3 1422
    Insert template 4 1722
    Insert template 5 2023
    End 2026

    __
    MS Office Professional Plus 2013

    __
    Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2609 v2 @2.50 GHz
    8GB RAM

  3. Daniel,

    The example availabe for download has all you need to run the test.

    Ctimer is in the class module.

  4. Thanks @Andre

    @Daniel, there’s a link to download the file at the bottom of the post. It has the timer class and everything else you need.

  5. XP, Excel 2010

    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 Start 0
    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 Create template 113
    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 Insert template 1 171
    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 Insert template 2 223
    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 Insert template 3 274
    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 Insert template 4 327
    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 Insert template 5 380
    Version: 14.0 20151028164642 End 380

  6. @André Thanks for the download hint, I had just copied & pasted the code example…

    I should add that this is all happening in VirtualBox VMs. The host is a Thinkpad T430s with i5-3320 CPU @ 2.6 GHz and 16 GB RAM (the VMs have 4 GB RAM).

  7. And, sorry, one more thing, don’t mean to pollute these comments (but can’t edit my comment either):

    The first two runs are on Windows 7 64-bit, the last one is on Windows XP 32-bit. Office is 32-bit in all cases. And the host is running Ubuntu 15.10 64-bit.

  8. Other stuff

    Split Excel 2010 “Two” Excel 2013 “Two” Excel 2013 “Three” Excel 2010 “Three”
    Start 0.15 1.03 0.11 1.18
    Open template 1 220.58 566.98 167.20 126.28
    Open template 2 404.51 855.08 324.48 211.55
    Open template 3 624.12 1,124.41 489.23 304.83
    Open template 4 781.47 1,433.73 656.74 391.59
    Open template 5 950.48 1,717.69 828.01 468.29
    End 999.50 1,796.36 828.35 468.63

    and

    Well “Three” looks promising. Of course in the real world I’m not simply adding a value to a range. So I’ll have to see if creating a template and adding a workbook based on that template five times is more or less than creating five workbooks from scratch.

  9. How refreshing to see the reality. Excel 2013 looks nice, but compared to Excel 2010 is appallingly slow on my work machine. dell Latitude E7240 i5 with 4GB RAM on Windows 7 32 bit.

    1 step forward and about 7 backward.

    Does a 64 bit machine wit 32 bit Excel 2013 run any better?

  10. Another approach to speed up your code ?

  11. My little experiment. I set it to iterate 50 times instead of 5 to give a more reliable measure and ran the code a few times to get an average. Then i ran the code with animations on and with them switched off (“Turn off unnecessary animations” in windows “Ease of Access Center”). This is with Excel 2013 (64bit).

    With animations on (average end time): 12000
    With animations off (average end time): 9300

    There’s a 25% saving for you! I’ve always hated those animations.

    And one other test just for my curiosity:

    Application.Sceenupdating = FALSE (average end time):3800

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